Welcome to Casa Segura/Bienvenidos a Casa Segura...

I don't want to go on being just a root in the shadows,
vacillating, extended, shivering with dream,
down in the damp bowels of earth,
absorbing it, thinking it, eating it every day.

-Pablo Neruda from 'Walking Around'

Border issues in the news...

Body of migrant, 15, found; several people rescued

The body of a 15-year-old illegal immigrant boy was found by U.S. Border Patrol agents late Saturday night near Arivaca.

Agents also rescued several people in incidents over the hot weekend along Arizona's stretch of U.S.-Mexican border.

A crew aboard a Customs and Border Protection Air and Marine helicopter just before midnight Saturday spotted what appeared to be a body in a wash south of Arivaca, about 50 miles southwest of Tucson, said Mario Escalante, Border Patrol Tucson Sector spokesman.

An agent went to the wash and found the body, Escalante said. Personal belongings nearby in a backpack indicated the body was that of a 15-year-old from Jalisco, Mexico, he said.

The 100-degree-plus heat put many other illegal immigrants in danger as well. The Border Patrol performed two other noteworthy rescues Sunday and were in the midst of another Monday.

The Maricopa County Sheriff's Office called the Border Patrol about 9:30 a.m. Sunday reporting that a suspected illegal immigrant was suffering from severe dehydration near Interstate 8, east of Gila Bend, Escalante said. When agents arrived, they found a 31-year-old man from Mexico in bad condition. He was flown by helicopter to Maricopa Medical Center in Phoenix, Escalante said. As of Sunday night, he was still unconscious in the intensive care unit, he said.

His brother, who was found with him, told agents that a group of illegal immigrants had helped him move his brother closer to the highway. Agents found a group of seven illegal immigrants from Mexico nearby. Three of them were suffering from dehydration and were taken by ground ambulance to Banner Estrella Medical Center in Phoenix, he said.

About 3 a.m. Sunday near the town of Cobabi on the Tohono O'odham Nation, agents found a 22-year-old woman from El Salvador who had been reported missing by her brother the night before. Her feet were so badly blistered she couldn't walk, and she was dehydrated, Escalante said. She was treated at the scene and sent for processing and deportation to her home country in Central America.

Agents were still searching the reservation Monday afternoon for a man whose brother told agents late Sunday night that his sibling had been left behind. Agents caught the brother about 11 p.m.east of Why on Arizona 86, Escalante said. The man told agents that his brother was dehydrated and left behind. Agents were searching the area, Escalante said.

This article is by Brady McCombs, from the Arizona Daily Star

Body of migrant, 15, found; several people rescued

The body of a 15-year-old illegal immigrant boy was found by U.S. Border Patrol agents late Saturday night near Arivaca.

Agents also rescued several people in incidents over the hot weekend along Arizona's stretch of U.S.-Mexican border.

A crew aboard a Customs and Border Protection Air and Marine helicopter just before midnight Saturday spotted what appeared to be a body in a wash south of Arivaca, about 50 miles southwest of Tucson, said Mario Escalante, Border Patrol Tucson Sector spokesman.

An agent went to the wash and found the body, Escalante said. Personal belongings nearby in a backpack indicated the body was that of a 15-year-old from Jalisco, Mexico, he said.

The 100-degree-plus heat put many other illegal immigrants in danger as well. The Border Patrol performed two other noteworthy rescues Sunday and were in the midst of another Monday.

The Maricopa County Sheriff's Office called the Border Patrol about 9:30 a.m. Sunday reporting that a suspected illegal immigrant was suffering from severe dehydration near Interstate 8, east of Gila Bend, Escalante said.
When agents arrived, they found a 31-year-old man from Mexico in bad condition. He was flown by helicopter to Maricopa Medical Center in Phoenix, Escalante said. As of Sunday night, he was still unconscious in the intensive care unit, he said.

His brother, who was found with him, told agents that a group of illegal immigrants had helped him move his brother closer to the highway. Agents found a group of seven illegal immigrants from Mexico nearby. Three of them were suffering from dehydration and were taken by ground ambulance to Banner Estrella Medical Center in Phoenix, he said.

About 3 a.m. Sunday near the town of Cobabi on the Tohono O'odham Nation, agents found a 22-year-old woman from El Salvador who had been reported missing by her brother the night before. Her feet were so badly blistered she couldn't walk, and she was dehydrated, Escalante said. She was treated at the scene and sent for processing and deportation to her home country in Central America.

Agents were still searching the reservation Monday afternoon for a man whose brother told agents late Sunday night that his sibling had been left behind. Agents caught the brother about 11 p.m.east of Why on Arizona 86, Escalante said. The man told agents that his brother was dehydrated and left behind. Agents were searching the area, Escalante said.

This article is by Brady McCombs, from the Arizona Daily Star

Body of migrant, 15, found; several people rescued

The body of a 15-year-old illegal immigrant boy was found by U.S. Border Patrol agents late Saturday night near Arivaca.

Agents also rescued several people in incidents over the hot weekend along Arizona's stretch of U.S.-Mexican border.

A crew aboard a Customs and Border Protection Air and Marine helicopter just before midnight Saturday spotted what appeared to be a body in a wash south of Arivaca, about 50 miles southwest of Tucson, said Mario Escalante, Border Patrol Tucson Sector spokesman.
An agent went to the wash and found the body, Escalante said. Personal belongings nearby in a backpack indicated the body was that of a 15-year-old from Jalisco, Mexico, he said.

The 100-degree-plus heat put many other illegal immigrants in danger as well. The Border Patrol performed two other noteworthy rescues Sunday and were in the midst of another Monday.

The Maricopa County Sheriff's Office called the Border Patrol about 9:30 a.m. Sunday reporting that a suspected illegal immigrant was suffering from severe dehydration near Interstate 8, east of Gila Bend, Escalante said.
When agents arrived, they found a 31-year-old man from Mexico in bad condition. He was flown by helicopter to Maricopa Medical Center in Phoenix, Escalante said. As of Sunday night, he was still unconscious in the intensive care unit, he said.

His brother, who was found with him, told agents that a group of illegal immigrants had helped him move his brother closer to the highway. Agents found a group of seven illegal immigrants from Mexico nearby. Three of them were suffering from dehydration and were taken by ground ambulance to Banner Estrella Medical Center in Phoenix, he said.

About 3 a.m. Sunday near the town of Cobabi on the Tohono O'odham Nation, agents found a 22-year-old woman from El Salvador who had been reported missing by her brother the night before. Her feet were so badly blistered she couldn't walk, and she was dehydrated, Escalante said. She was treated at the scene and sent for processing and deportation to her home country in Central America.

Agents were still searching the reservation Monday afternoon for a man whose brother told agents late Sunday night that his sibling had been left behind. Agents caught the brother about 11 p.m.east of Why on Arizona 86, Escalante said. The man told agents that his brother was dehydrated and left behind. Agents were searching the area, Escalante said.

This article is by Brady McCombs, from the Arizona Daily Star

Border agents locate two bodies, rescue dozens

The discovery of the remains of two illegal immigrants and the rescue of dozens of others —including a pregnant woman and three others in a remote mountainous area — highlighted activity the past four days along Arizona's stretch of U.S.-Mexican border.

Agents also made a trio or large marijuana seizures.

Border deaths

On Tuesday at about 7 a.m., a National Guard helicopter that was helping Border Patrol agents track a group of illegal immigrants spotted the body of a man southwest of Picacho Peak, said Rob Daniels, Border Patrol Tucson Sector spokesman.

They estimated the man was about 40 years old. It appeared as though he had died several days earlier, he said.

On Saturday afternoon, agents found the skeletal remains of what they believe was a 38-year-old Mexican man northeast of Arivaca near the Sopori KX Ranch, Daniels said.

Mountain rescue

Border Patrol agents made five rescues of illegal immigrants in severe danger from Saturday through Tuesday.
The most dramatic and lengthy rescue started late Saturday and ended early Sunday in the Huachuca Mountains southwest of Sierra Vista in Cochise County.

It began at 10:15 p.m. when agents apprehended four illegal immigrants in a rugged mountain area near Carr Canyon and Ramsey Canyon in the Huachuca Mountains south of the Fort Huachuca, Daniels said. Two of them — a Mexican man and a Guatemalan woman who was three months pregnant — were showing signs of heatstroke and severe dehydration, he said.

After the agent determined the two wouldn't be able to walk down from the mountainous area, they sent a Customs and Border Protection Black Hawk helicopter to the area. The helicopter, however, couldn't land.
They decided the two agents should stay with the four illegal immigrants and wait for the helicopter to return with supplies. At 12:30 a.m. Sunday, the helicopter dropped water, food, blankets and batteries for the agents' radios.

"The idea was to attempt to rehydrate and reacclimate themselves in hopes of them being in a better situation closer to morning time," Daniels said.

By 5 a.m., a pair of Borstar agents — the Border Patrol's search, rescue and trauma unit — arrived after hiking all night, Daniels said. They gave the illegal immigrants intravenous fluids. Then, they walked down to a road where agents could pick them up.

At 6:30 a.m., the agents and the four illegal immigrants were all off the mountain. No further treatment was necessary and the three illegal immigrants from Mexico were processed and granted voluntary returns to Mexico.

The pregnant woman was processed and set up for an expedited removal to get her back to Guatemala, Daniels said.

Continue reading this article by By Brady McCombs in the Arizona Daily Star

Our lethal policies

The season of dying has started along Arizona's southern deserts.

Those who die are illegal immigrants, so some people say they get what they deserve.

After all, some people say, "What part of 'illegal' don't you understand?"

They've said it so loudly and for so long that they nearly drowned out some of Arizona's other voices.

In hard fact, what happens along the Arizona-Mexico border every summer is an enduring humanitarian crisis that takes the lives of real people.

Husbands.

Wives.

Sons and daughters.

Fences haven't stopped the deaths. Increases in Border Patrol agents haven't stopped it. The National Guard didn't stop it.

According to Border Patrol reckoning, 61 migrants died in the Tucson Sector from Oct. 1 through April 30. This tally is seven fewer than for the same period last year, which echoes a drop in the number of illegal immigrants caught entering the country.

Even at a reduced number, this represents a tragedy that Arizonans should not be willing to accept or ignore. What's more, those 61 souls perished before the summer heat begins taking a toll.

Migrants have long died trying to cross the border, but the numbers more than doubled from 1995 to 2005, according to the Government Accountability Office. More than three-quarters of that increase happened in Arizona. It was the result of enhanced enforcement in urban areas, which forced migrants deeper into harsh desert country.

The Rev. Robin Hoover has been keeping track of where deaths occur. He says that, eight years ago, bodies were generally found within three-quarters of a mile of a road. Now, they are found nearly 5 miles from the nearest road. The reason? Increased enforcement has driven migrants to even more remote and dangerous areas.

Hoover founded Humane Borders to try to save lives by placing water tanks along routes used by migrants. Despite the decreased numbers of border crossers this year, Hoover says the water stations disperse in excess of 1,500 gallons a week.

Years ago, The Republic editorial page began writing about summer death counts in the hope of shaming Congress into reforming immigration policies that contribute to those deaths. Washington wasn't paying much attention.

In recent years, the issue of illegal immigration reached hot-button status. Attention jumped right over those dead bodies. It leaped past the human dimension. Instead of being seen as people who are caught in a broken system, migrants are now portrayed as villains who are unworthy of sympathy.

That's where Arizona is today. Anger has the upper hand. Rage is louder than reason.

But Arizona risks its humanity if it can't refocus on what immigration policies are doing to real people.

Husbands.

Wives.

Sons and daughters.

The humanitarian crisis along our southern border needs to recognized for the tragedy it is. Policies that contribute to deaths by driving migrants deeper into the desert need to be assessed for the impact they have on people.

These things need to happen for the sake of the migrants' humanity.

And Arizona's.

Article from the Arizona Republic

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